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END ROT!?? NOOOOOO!!!!
Biblis
ladytairngire wrote in kitchen_gardens
I lost more than half my tomato crop last year to end rot. This year I took extra precautions... regulation distance between plants, buried egg shells at the roots, faithful watering, and still! This!! Whyyyyy!?!?




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The problem is, the pathogen that causes blossom end rot can live in the soil and overwinter. Composting (getting up to a killing heat) or rotatingout of the crop for a few years are the only ways to get rid of the pathogen.

I read that end-rot is a physiological thing, not a pathogen...

But yes, you are right about BER it is a calcium deficieny... but the fact that it is on tiny green tomatoes...

yeah, I thought I had all that covered.

All I can think is it's the excessive heat, which also hit us last year as my first fruits were coming in. I'm going to put down mulch and start watering twice a day to see if I can salvage the rest.

but if it's the heat, why aren't I hearing more local tomato-related laments? :(

Burying eggshells is a good idea of course, but just how many did you use. If you think about it, its probably not enough calcium unless you added a few pounds of them per 100 square feet. as well as other calium sources like bone meal, rock phosphate or a good dse of compost. In this heat wave you are probably watering more than usual, which of course washes minerals out of the soil

This hot dry season, blossom end rot was very evident amoung the 200plus plots in the community garden where I garden. I didn't have a problem because I uses enomous amounts of compost, rock phosphate, bonemeal and greensand. I did though have blossom end rot in some of the tomatoes in my containers at home, which were watered heavily every day.

How many eggshells? Rough estimate, a dozen per plant, 2 ft space on either side of the romas and three on the brandywines (the romas, to date, are the only ones impacted). There's also potentially a source of calcium - maybe - from the retaining wall at the rear of the garden box, though I don't know about that. Soil is a mix of compost, humus, and native dirt (hard clay).

I watered once a day, giving a thorough soaking (directed down to the roots through watering spikes, to keep the moisture off the leaves), though I'm sure the soil dried out in between due to the heat wave.


...and of course talk to your fellow gardeners and find out what they did that prevented the problem.

A dozen eggshells per plant may not be adding enough calcium, especially since they are a slow-release form; only a fraction of the Ca in the shells will be available to the plants until they completely decompose. Better to add bone meal for immediate Ca, and soft rock phosphate for a long-term source.

Also, what are your night-time temperatures? Nights below 55F can cause BER even in good soil.

A dozen eggshells per plant may not be adding enough calcium, especially since they are a slow-release form; only a fraction of the Ca in the shells will be available to the plants until they completely decompose. Better to add bone meal for immediate Ca, and soft rock phosphate for a long-term source.

Also, what are your night-time temperatures? Nights below 55F can cause BER even in good soil.

A dozen eggshells per plant may not be adding enough calcium, especially since they are a slow-release form; only a fraction of the Ca in the shells will be available to the plants until they completely decompose. Better to add bone meal for immediate Ca, and soft rock phosphate for a long-term source.

Also, what are your night-time temperatures? Nights below 55F can cause BER even in good soil.

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